Reading rules

Tips on getting kids to practice reading a little each night.

Learning Stages


By Shelby Moore

Teacher

Shelby Moore is a kindergarten teacher at an inner-city school in Houston and was recently awarded as one of the East Region's Campus Teachers of the Year.

Reading should be a fun activity for children, but sometimes kids need a boost to get them to practice a little each night. Twenty minutes should be set aside every night just for reading, and with everything else kids can chose from to keep them occupied (video games, TV programs, etc) books sometimes are left up on the shelf.

This March there are several different programs going on to encourage kids to keep READING, READING, READING! One of the events that I blogged about last year, to get kids motivated about reading is Read Across America (RAA). 

This year the event that I am using to get my students excited about reading, in addition to RAA is the Iditarod. The Iditarod is an annual sled dog race in the Alaskan Interior and western coast, known as "The Last Great Race". 

You may be asking yourself, "How does this tie in with reading?" Great question! Like the Iditarod mushers, your kids will be logging reading minutes and hours just like the mushers that are logging minutes and hours on the Alaskan trail. There is a great website dedicated to using the Iditarod as a motivator to get kids reading. They have cleverly named their event the Idita-READ

Here are some things you may need to help you with your reading journey:

  • Tablet to log reading minutes.
  • Map of Alaska's Iditarod trail.  If you choose to sign up with Idita-read you can log your minutes online and the website will automatically show your little musher their location on the trail. It will move them ahead just like on a game board.
  • Rewards. Determine appropriate rewards to give your child as they get to each checkpoint on the Iditarod Trail.
  • Books, books and more books.